THEME
,hemlock grove  
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posted: 1 hour ago
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   j

middlemarching:

Gipsy Danger | Mark III Jaeger | Pilots: Yancy & Raleigh Becket

if looking at this gifset doesn’t immediately get the Pacific Rim theme stuck in your head, then you’re a filthy liar because the Pacific Rim theme is totally stuck in your head rn

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posted: 1 hour ago
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   j
oh sinner man where you gonna run to

not to the rock, he’s a bitch.

,babyjugs  
posted: 1 hour ago
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   j

i’m supposed to leave for church in 30 min.

HELP ME.

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   j
,
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   j

deepad | I Didn’t Dream of Dragons

nothing-rhymes-with-grantaire:

There are far more eloquent writers who have pointed out how difficult it is to growing up reading books (and watching movies) about a culture alien to you, and how pernicious the influences thereof can be. I am lucky in that Indian culture is more widely represented in Western media than other colonised regions—when I talk about Bollywood in the yuletide chat room, there are people who have an idea about what I might be referring to, bastardised ideas of ‘pundit’ and ‘caste system’ and ‘karma’ and ‘reincarnation’ are present in the English vocabulary. Yet still, my ability to connect fannishly with people from different parts of the world is mediated through the coloniser’s language and representation. Enid Blyton, with her hideous caricatures of African tribal boys helping the intrepid British children is read from Johannesburg to Jaipur—Iktomi stories are not.

These imbalances of power are what frustrate me in several discussions regarding issues of representation and diversity in writing that I’ve seen recently. I am summarising some positions that I have heard, and my responses to them.

READ THIS. It is commentary from an Indian writer named Deepa D. about race and depictions of race in literature and how writing and literature favours American/Western values and cultures. It brings up narratives from the author’s life and examples of Western culture’s literary attempts to represent non-Western cultures “respectfully” in order to hammer home this point:

 I would like to say that this well-intentioned championing of diversity is specific to countries that are trying to celebrate their appropriation of other cultures.

,link  
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   j
dear friends,
you are the pillars constantly
keeping my ceiling from crashing in,
and i thank you for that.
ps, i love you, e.f.b. (via queercarlos)
,
posted: 2 hours ago
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   j

Flora Kim as Mylluin of Nevrast, Lady of the House of the Harp of Gondolin.
Born by Linaewen into a Falathrim family of Nevrast ferrymen, Mylluin met Salgant during the migration of Turgon’s people to Vinyamar, and they married as soon as propriety allowed. After her coming to Gondolin, Mylluin became a renowned muse and model for the city’s artists and artisans. 
For Legendarium Ladies April and Gondolin Week.

Flora Kim as Mylluin of Nevrast, Lady of the House of the Harp of Gondolin.

Born by Linaewen into a Falathrim family of Nevrast ferrymen, Mylluin met Salgant during the migration of Turgon’s people to Vinyamar, and they married as soon as propriety allowed. After her coming to Gondolin, Mylluin became a renowned muse and model for the city’s artists and artisans.

For Legendarium Ladies April and Gondolin Week.

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